Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway traces its origins to December 1845 when the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad was chartered. The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad was Tennessee’s first railroad. Following the Civil War, the railroad began to acquire other lines, and in 1873, the company’s name changed to the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway. However, the railroad never reached St. Louis. The line’s major competition was from the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. In 1880, the Louisville & Nashville gained a controlling interest in the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway, but the two lines remained

Etowah Railroad

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

Once upon a time, Bartow County, Ga., was an important railroad town. Today, the dozens of CSX trains simply traverse the countryside of this north Georgia county.

Western & Atlantic Railroad

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

ATLANTA – On Dec. 21, 1836, the Georgia state Legislature authorized the construction of a railroad between Atlanta and Chattanooga, Tenn., forever shaping the state’s history. Surveying for the railroad, which would become the Western & Atlantic Railroad, began in 1837. Construction began in November 1839, and the complete line was opened in 1850. The first train between Atlanta and Marietta, Ga., ran on Dec. 23, 1842. It would be another three years before regular rail service would begin on the stretch of track. The railroad’s southern terminus, Atlanta, was a growing railroad town, which by the mid 19th century

Tennessee & Cumberland River Railroad

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

TENNESSEE RIDGE, Tenn. – April 27, 1898, marked the beginning of a very obscure railroad that was built to serve the community’s iron industry. That day, the Tennessee & Cumberland River Railroad was incorporated, and the 13.95-mile line was built at a cost of $110,000. The railroad remained in operation until 1917. According to Elmer Sulzer’s 1975 book “Ghost Railroads of Tennessee,” the railroad owned one locomotive, one passenger coach and 13 freight cars. In Tennessee Ridge, the Tennessee & Cumberland River Railroad had a junction with the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. On the other end, the railroad terminated in

Tennessee Central Railway

December 31, 2006 Todd DeFeo 0

The Tennessee Central Railway connected Nashville, Tenn., and Hopkinsville, Ky. The railroad operated until it went bankrupt in 1968. It was taken over by the Illinois Central Gulf, which operated trains through Clarksville until the early 1980s.

South Carolina Canal and Railroad

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

In 1827, South Carolina granted permission to the South Carolina Canal and Railroad to build a line. In September 1829, the company hired Horatio Allen as its chief engineer and track work began on Jan. 14, 1830 – two years after the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. On Dec. 24, 1830, the railroad demonstrated the Best Friend of Charleston. The locomotive, designed by E.L. Miller and C.E. Detmold, was built at the West Point Foundry in New York City. The day after the trial run, the Best Friend of Charleston was placed into regular duty by the railroad and would remain

The Indiana, Alabama & Texas Railroad

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

The Indiana, Alabama & Texas Railroad was one of three railroads that used to pass through the Gateway to the New South. However, despite the suggestion of its name, the road never reached Indiana, Alabama or Texas.

1 2 3