Small locomotive highlights area’s railroad roots

October 19, 2009 Todd DeFeo 0

MARIETTA, Ga. – The little locomotive sitting in a fenced in area under a canopy is dwarfed by the locomotives that pass by no more than 50 feet away. Locomotive No. 81421 was built in 1916 by Marietta’s own Glover Machine works. The 2-6-0 narrow gauge steam engine operated as Coulbourn Brothers No. 4 starting the following year. In 1921, the locomotive returned to Glover Machine Works. Glover Machine Works dates to the early 1890s and was an important steam locomotive builder, although it was less known than many of the other, larger builders. The company built 200 locomotives between

Terminal Station harkens back to city’s railroad past

September 22, 2009 Todd DeFeo 0

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. – During the Civil War, the railroad was vital to Chattanooga, bringing supplies to the troops stationed in the city and also transporting reinforcements to nearby destinations. In April 1862, Chattanooga was the destination of the failed Andrews Raid — a Union raid aimed at destroying the Western & Atlantic Railroad that served the city. Over the years, a number of major railroads served the city, including the Cincinnati Southern Railway, which on March 5, 1880, operated a southbound that departed Cincinnati bound for Chattanooga that was nicknamed Chattanooga Choo Choo, or so the story goes. During its

‘Pardon me boy,’ is that an historic train depot?

September 7, 2009 Todd DeFeo 0

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. – The events of 1970 could have spelled doom for Chattanooga’s Terminal Station. On Aug. 11 of that year, the final train departed from the station. Over the past 170 years, Chattanooga is probably best known for its railroads. But, with the advent of cars and highways, rail travel was obsolete by the 1970s, and the station’s fate seemed sealed. But in 1971, a group of local businessmen intervened and bought the station. After more than a year of renovations, the Chattanooga Choo Choo hotel reopened in the former station following an April 11, 1973, re-dedication. The structure

Conyers’ ‘Dinky’ harkens back to yesterday

July 14, 2009 Railfanning.org 0

CONYERS, Ga. – Between 1948 and about 1960, a small 0-6-0 steam locomotive served on the 3-mile-long Milstead Railroad. The small locomotive hauled between Callaway Mills in the small community of Milstead and nearby Conyers, where the line interchanged with the Georgia Railroad. Engine No. 104, built in 1905 by Rogers, is, according to some sources, one of only a handful of this type locomotive still in existence. The engine apparently picked up the nickname “Dinky” because of its short stature. The West Point Railroad originally owned the Dinky. Callaway Mills, formerly the Milstead Manufacturing Co., bought the locomotive in

Nov. 1, 1918: Malbone Street Wreck

June 28, 2009 Railfanning.org 0

Nov. 1, 1918: A Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. train crashes after taking a curve too fast underneath the intersection of Malbone Street and Flathbush and Ocean avenues. In all, 97 people are killed in the wreck known as the Malbone Street Wreck. Instead of taking the curve at 6 mph, the train is traveling between 30 mph and 40 mph. The elevated train, consisting of five cars constructed primarily of wood, entered the tunnel portal beneath Malbone Street, negotiating a curve designated to be taken at 6 mph at a speed estimated at between 30 and 40 mph. The trailing

1 4 5 6 7 8 10