‘Pardon me boys,’ is that an historic train depot?

September 7, 2009 Railfanning.org 0

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. – The events of 1970 could have spelled doom for Chattanooga’s Terminal Station. On Aug. 11 of that year, the final train departed from the station. Over the past 170 years, Chattanooga is probably best known for its railroads. But, with the advent of cars and highways, rail travel was obsolete by the 1970s, and the station’s fate seemed sealed. But in 1971, a group of local businessmen intervened and bought the station. After more than a year of renovations, the Chattanooga Choo Choo hotel reopened in the former station following an April 11, 1973, re-dedication. The structure

Get in touch with Casey Jones and Jackson’s railroad past

April 30, 2009 Railfanning.org 0

JACKSON, Tenn. – When Casey Jones’ locomotive crashed near Vaughn, Miss., he vaulted into history and American folklore. The subject of songs and books, Jones, who died on April 30, 1900, has become a larger than life figure in American history in the 11 decades since his death. But, finding the real Casey Jones is as simple as driving to Jackson, Tenn., where visitors can see the humble home where Jones lived at the time of his death. Born John Luther Jones on March 14, 1863, in Southeast Missouri, he grew up in Cayce, Ky., the town that provided him

Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway traces its origins to December 1845 when the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad was chartered. The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad was Tennessee’s first railroad. Following the Civil War, the railroad began to acquire other lines, and in 1873, the company’s name changed to the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway. However, the railroad never reached St. Louis. The line’s major competition was from the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. In 1880, the Louisville & Nashville gained a controlling interest in the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway, but the two lines remained

Tennessee & Cumberland River Railroad

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

TENNESSEE RIDGE, Tenn. – April 27, 1898, marked the beginning of a very obscure railroad that was built to serve the community’s iron industry. That day, the Tennessee & Cumberland River Railroad was incorporated, and the 13.95-mile line was built at a cost of $110,000. The railroad remained in operation until 1917. According to Elmer Sulzer’s 1975 book “Ghost Railroads of Tennessee,” the railroad owned one locomotive, one passenger coach and 13 freight cars. In Tennessee Ridge, the Tennessee & Cumberland River Railroad had a junction with the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. On the other end, the railroad terminated in

Tennessee Central Railway

December 31, 2006 Todd DeFeo 0

The Tennessee Central Railway connected Nashville, Tenn., and Hopkinsville, Ky. The railroad operated until it went bankrupt in 1968. It was taken over by the Illinois Central Gulf, which operated trains through Clarksville until the early 1980s.

The Indiana, Alabama & Texas Railroad

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

The Indiana, Alabama & Texas Railroad was one of three railroads that used to pass through the Gateway to the New South. However, despite the suggestion of its name, the road never reached Indiana, Alabama or Texas.

The Legacy of Casey Jones

May 1, 2005 Todd DeFeo 0

Casey Jones is as much myth as he is historic figure. Jones was catapulted into American folklore and became a railroad legend shortly before 4 a.m. on April 30, 1900.

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