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History

Conyers’ ‘Dinky’ harkens back to yesterday

CONYERS, Ga. – Between 1948 and about 1960, a small 0-6-0 steam locomotive served on the 3-mile-long Milstead Railroad. The small locomotive hauled between Callaway Mills in the small community of Milstead and nearby Conyers, where the line interchanged with the Georgia Railroad. Engine No. 104, built in 1905 by Rogers, is, according to some sources, one of only a handful of this type locomotive still in existence. The engine apparently picked up the nickname “Dinky” because of its short stature. The West Point Railroad originally owned the Dinky. Callaway Mills, formerly the Milstead Manufacturing Co., bought the locomotive in

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History

Nov. 1, 1918: Malbone Street Wreck

Nov. 1, 1918: A Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. train crashes after taking a curve too fast underneath the intersection of Malbone Street and Flathbush and Ocean avenues. In all, 97 people are killed in the wreck known as the Malbone Street Wreck. Instead of taking the curve at 6 mph, the train is traveling between 30 mph and 40 mph. The elevated train, consisting of five cars constructed primarily of wood, entered the tunnel portal beneath Malbone Street, negotiating a curve designated to be taken at 6 mph at a speed estimated at between 30 and 40 mph. The trailing

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Rail Blog

Train show features models, memorabilia and more

NORCROSS, Ga. – The Great Train Expo hit town this weekend, offering everyone from avid railfans to first-timers the chance to peruse an assortment of railroad memorabilia, model trains and everything in between. Atlanta resident Ruth Mitcham attended her first train show. She enjoyed the show’s atmosphere, especially the model train layouts. “It’s just interesting to see this many people doing what they love,” she said as she watched a Florida East Coast locomotive pulling a mixed freight train on the Georgia Division of the Atlantic Coast S Gaugers’ layout. “Everybody seems to take such joy in it.” The Great

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History

Standing where the raiders once stood

MARIETTA, Ga. – The Kennesaw House is an impressive building, even by today’s standards. But its role in one of the most fascinating events of the Civil War is what makes it truly unique. Built in 1845 as a cotton warehouse, it is one of the oldest buildings in Marietta, and it has witnessed a lot over the years. After serving as a warehouse for some time, the building was converted into the Fletcher House Hotel, and on April 11, 1862, with the Civil War in Full Swing, the Fletcher House unknowingly played host to a group of Union spies

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Rail Blog

End of Track

NORCROSS, Ga. — From the looks of this sign, it looks as though someone didn’t heed the message on this sign. Didn’t see any derailed cars, though….

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Rail Blog

I’m Standing at the Station…

…And I’m Waiting on My Train to Come TOKYO — The subway car is silent except for the sound of metal wheels on metal rails as the train made its way beneath Tokyo’s busy streets. Commuters look at their cell phones, read newspapers or simply mind their own business. There is no conversation. It’s eerie just how quiet a busy subway in a major city can be. We finally made our way to Tokyo station where we planned to catch the Shinkansen. The Tokyo station was precise. Attendants clad in blue uniforms stood attention near a waiting Shinkansen. The train

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Historic Profiles

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad

On Feb. 28, 1827, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad – arguably the most important railroad in American history – received its charter from the Maryland and broke ground on July 4, 1828 – 52 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence. On hand for the ceremony was Charles Carroll, the last surviving person to have signed the Declaration of Independence. On Jan. 7, 1830, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad started its daily run, though tracks were not yet completed between Baltimore and Ellicott’s Mill, Md. It was the first time in American history a railroad carried revenue passengers.