No Picture
FRA

New FRA Study Re-Affirms Safety of Push-Pull Passenger Rail Operations

WASHINGTON – A comprehensive federal study of accident data found that push-pull passenger rail service has an excellent safety record and that a train being pushed has virtually no greater likelihood of derailing after a highway-rail grade crossing collision than one with a locomotive in the lead, Federal Railroad Administrator Joseph H. Boardman announced. “Preventing accidents and protecting passengers have much more to do with improving safety than whether the locomotive is in the front or rear of a train,” Boardman said of the report’s findings. The study re-affirms the conclusions of a previous report issued in July 2005 by

No Picture
FRA

New Federal Rule Aims to Reduce Human Error As Cause of Train Accidents

ATLANTA – Visiting a railroad employee training facility in Atlanta, Federal Railroad Administration Administrator Joseph H. Boardman announced March 2 that his agency intends to issue regulations to address the most common human errors that cause train accidents. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) is accelerating development of a rule that will focus on reducing the most common human errors such as improperly lined track switches, shoving or pushing rail cars without properly monitoring for safe conditions, and leaving rail cars in a position that obstruct an adjacent track, Boardman said. The proposed regulations will be published by September 2006. “The

No Picture
FRA

Federal Railroad Administration Urges Safer Shipments of Time-Sensitive Hazardous Materials by Rail

WASHINGTON — Railroads, manufacturers, refiners, and businesses that ship or receive hazardous materials by rail should immediately improve procedures for tracking the movement of time-sensitive shipments, according to a Safety Advisory distributed by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) on Oct. 5. “Anyone involved in shipping hazardous materials must take the necessary steps to ensure that time-sensitive products are properly tracked from origin to final destination,” said FRA Administrator Joseph H. Boardman. “There is no margin for error when it comes to shipping hazardous materials. Everyone involved in this process has to get it right.” The Safety Advisory requests that all

No Picture
FRA

To Report or Not to Report? New York Times: Railroads Hamper Federal Investigations

Railroads, The New York Times reported July 11, have hampered federal investigations by failing to promptly report fatal crashes. The report immediately sparked criticism from Union Pacific and the Federal Railroad Administration. “It’s a systemic failure,” James E. Hall, a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, told The New York Times. “It’s been something that has just not grabbed the attention, unfortunately, of the public.” The newspaper’s investigation called Union Pacific a “stark example of how some railroads, even as they blame motorists, repeatedly sidestep their own responsibility in grade-crossing fatalities.” “Their actions range from destroying, mishandling or

No Picture
FRA

Report: Railroads Hamper Federal Investigations

Railroads, The New York Times reported July 11, have hampered federal investigations by failing to promptly report fatal crashes. The report immediately sparked criticism from Union Pacific and the Federal Railroad Administration. “It’s a systemic failure,” James E. Hall, a former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, told The New York Times. “It’s been something that has just not grabbed the attention, unfortunately, of the public.” The newspaper’s investigation called Union Pacific a “stark example of how some railroads, even as they blame motorists, repeatedly sidestep their own responsibility in grade-crossing fatalities.” “Their actions range from destroying, mishandling or

No Picture
FRA

FRA Proposes to Improve Crash Survivability of Locomotive ‘Black Box’

WASHINGTON – Event recorders, the train equivalent of an airplane’s “black box,” will be improved to make sure critical information survives train accidents according to a proposed rule issued June 30 by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). “The survival of data is key to understanding why a train accident happened,” said FRA Acting Administrator Betty Monro. “Having a better ‘black box’ will improve our ability to prevent future accidents.” The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) published in today’s Federal Register addresses several safety recommendations made by the National Transportation Safety Board to improve the quality of data available for post-accident