The Indiana, Alabama & Texas Railroad

December 31, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

The Indiana, Alabama & Texas Railroad was one of three railroads that used to pass through the Gateway to the New South. However, despite the suggestion of its name, the road never reached Indiana, Alabama or Texas.

Rome Railroad

August 24, 2006 Railfanning.org 0

ROME, Ga. – The Rome Railroad was founded on Dec. 21, 1839, as the Memphis Branch Railroad and Steamboat Company of Georgia. The line’s 20-mile route between Rome, Ga., and Kingston, Ga., was completed in 1849. The following year, the company changed its name to the Rome Railroad Company. “From Rome, cotton and other commodities were shipped down river on the Coosa to Gadsden, Alabama and other points,” reads a historical marker in Kingston. The route was sold to the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway in 1894, which by that time leased the Western & Atlantic Railroad, which passed

Elkton & Guthrie Railroad

August 24, 2005 Railfanning.org 0

GUTHRIE, Ky. – The Elkton & Guthrie Railroad was incorporated on Feb. 10, 1871, as the Elkton Railroad Company. “Work on the railroad was very slow and 13 years later, only the right of way had been cleared and the roadbed graded,” Dennis Mize wrote in his 1999 book L&N’s Memphis Line. “To make matters worse, the line was out of money and the prospects of raising additional funds for laying track and purchasing rolling stock were bleak,” Mize wrote. “The problem was solved by turning to L&N’s president, Milton H. Smith, who signed a contract on Aug. 30, 1884

Runnin’ Down a Train

July 1, 2004 Todd DeFeo 0

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. — I was driving along Interstate 24, when I came to a familiar bridge over a rail line. On every trip along this stretch of highway, it was tradition to gaze over and see what train might be traversing the Rutherford County landscape. Usually, there wasn’t a train, just a pair of parallel rails heading towards the horizon. But today was different. I caught a glimpse of a pair of locomotives — the lead being a BNSF C44-9W, No. 5097. “Surely, this must be rare,” I thought to myself. Regardless, I was deter- mined to catch this one

www.thecrosstie.com Launches

June 15, 2004 The Cross-Tie 0

ATLANTA – Railfanning.org has launched www.thecrosstie.com, a website for the e-zine The Cross-Tie. The Cross-Tie began its online publication in January 2003 and 10 issues were released in its first year. Five issues have been released to date in 2004. “This is a big step for The Cross-Tie,” Publisher Todd DeFeo said. “This web site will give people the opportunity to easily access the e-zine’s official web page.” Railfanning.org posts regular news updates on its News Wire web page. The monthly e-zine is available on Railfanning.org and through Train Kept A-Rollin’ – its Yahoo Group, which is open to the

An ‘Appalling Catastrophe’

February 1, 2004 Todd DeFeo 0

At about 8 p.m. on Sept. 29, 1906, a northbound Louisville & Nashville Railroad passenger train — No. 102 — steamed towards a swing bridge crossing the Cumberland River. Near the overpass, a glowing red light broke the night’s darkness, signaling for an approaching train to stop.

Web site features trains in Marietta, Ga.

December 30, 2003 Railfanning.org 0

Marietta, Ga. – An updated website chronicles railroad activity in this metropolitan Atlanta town. Also included on the site – http://railfanning.org/trackside/marietta/ – is a brief history of railroads in Marietta. Everyday, dozens of freight trains pass through the town, which grew up along the Western and Atlantic Railroad’s main lines. Over the years, several other railroad companies have operated the tracks, today under the control of CSX Transportation. “Downtown Marietta offers railfans prime real estate for watching trains,” said Clarksville, Tenn., resident Todd DeFeo, webmaster of Railfanning.org. “Sidewalks along the right-of-way provide a safe viewing area of this heavily traveled

Hit the rails

May 18, 2003 Todd DeFeo 0

Whether it be steam or diesel that strikes your fancy, there are plenty of nearby railroad museums for train enthusiasts. Throughout Tennessee and Kentucky, more than a half dozen museums await exploration by anxious railroad buffs.

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