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Railroad Name
Location
Railroad History

The Bostwick Railroad began operations in about March 1907 on its roughly six-mile-long line between Bostwick, where it reached by about February 1907, and Apalachee, Georgia. Passenger operations on the line began in April 1907. In Apalachee, it connected with the Macon-to-Athens branch of the Central of Georgia Railway. The railroad was named for its president, John Bostwick. By August 1911, a receiver’s sale was announced for the railroad, including a 15-ton locomotive, a gondola, a baggage car and a passenger coach with two compartments that each sat 24 people. The Greene County Railroad, named for its president, Forrest Greene, purchased the assets of the Bostwick Railroad.

Incorporation Date
Circa 1906
Cessation Date
1911
Disposition
Purchased by the Greene County Railroad
Location
Railroad History

The state of New Jersey chartered the Camden & Amboy Rail Road and Transportation Company on February 4, 1830, the same day it chartered the Delaware and Raritan Canal Company. The railroad opened its line between Bordentown, New Jersey, and South Amboy, New Jersey on December 17, 1832. Later, after the incorporation of the New Jersey Rail Road & Transportation Company, the Camden & Amboy build a line between Trenton, New Jersey, and New Brunswick, New Jersey. In early 1867, the Camden & Amboy and the New Jersey Rail Road combined to make up the United New Jersey Railroad and Canal Company, which the Pennsylvania Railroad leased in 1871 for 999 years.

Incorporation Date
February 4, 1830
Cessation Date
1867
Disposition
A portion of its line is part of the Northeast Corridor
Railroad History

The Tennessee state legislature chartered the Edgefield & Kentucky Railroad on Feb. 13, 1852, to build a line between Edgefield Junction near Nashville, Tennessee, and the Tennessee-Kentucky state line (Guthrie, Kentucky). The railroad completed its line toward the end of 1859. It consolidated with the Evansville, Henderson & Nashville Railroad, chartered in 1867, in 1871. In 1879, the Louisville & Nashville Railroad purchased the Evansville, Henderson & Nashville.

Incorporation Date
Feb. 13, 1852
Disposition
Today part of CSX Transportation
Nickname
Jug Tavern Route
Location
Railroad History

The state of Georgia chartered the Gainesville, Jefferson & Southern Railroad on Aug. 23, 1872, to build a narrow-gauge railroad from Gainesville, Georgia, to a point on the Georgia Railroad via Jefferson, Georgia. The railroad ultimately built a line, which was completed on March 11, 1884, between Gainesville and Social Circle, Georgia, with a branch to Jefferson. By March 1897, the railroad was in receivership. A judge in July 1903 ordered the railroad sold, but the sale was ultimately postponed. However, by May 1904, a judge approved the sale of the line, and by July 1904, most of the line was sold at foreclosure to the new Gainesville Midland Railway.

Incorporation Date
Aug. 23, 1872
Cessation Date
1904
Disposition
Sold to the Gainesville Midland Railway
Location
Railroad History

The Greene County Railroad was incorporated on July 27, 1911, to build a line between Monroe and Bostwick, Georgia, and purchase the assets of the former Bostwick Railroad. By 1907, the Bostwick Railroad built a line between Apalachee and Bostwick. In Apalachee, the railroad interchanged with the Macon-to-Athens branch of the Central of Georgia Railway, and in Monroe, it interchanged with the Gainesville Midland. The 19.69-mile-long Greene County Railroad was abandoned in 1942.

Incorporation Date
1911
Cessation Date
1942
Disposition
Abandoned
Railroad Name
Location
Railroad History

The Hartwell Railroad chartered in 1878 (or 1879) to build a 10-mile-long line between Hartwell, Georgia, and Bowersville, Georgia, where it connected with the Elberton Air-Line Railroad (later the Southern Railway). The railroad, originally built as a narrow gauge line, completed grading by about September 1879. Southern Railway assumed control of the line in 1902. A group of local residents purchased the line for $40,000 in 1924, even though the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) appraised the line at $120,000. A local businessman, B.R. Anderson, purchased the line in 1990.

Incorporation Date
1878
Railroad History

The genesis for the Indiana, Alabama & Texas Railroad dates to the late 1860s and 1870s. The railroad formally emerged after merging three lines: the Mobile, Clarksville & Evansville Railroad, the Princeton & Ohio River Railroad and another company named the Indiana, Alabama & Texas Railroad. The railroad was unable to raise the capital needed to build much of a railroad and completed only about 30 miles of narrow gauge line between Clarksville, Tennessee, and Gracey, Kentucky, by 1886, when the Louisville & Nashville purchased the line. The Louisville & Nashville subsequently broadened the railroad to standard gauge and abandoned the route in May 1933.

Incorporation Date
1882
Cessation Date
May 1933
Disposition
Abandoned
Headquarters
Clarksville, Tennessee
Location
Railroad History

The Loganville & Lawrenceville Railroad was incorporated on March 30, 1898, and its 10.33-mile line between Loganville and Lawrenceville, Georgia, opened for operations on December 1, 1898. The Seaboard & Roanoke Railroad and the Raleigh & Gaston Railroad, subsidiaries of the Seaboard Air Line Railway, began leasing the line in 1898. The Seaboard Air Line Railway acquired the line in February 1902. The Loganville & Lawrenceville Railroad was abandoned in 1932.

Incorporation Date
1898
Cessation Date
1932
Disposition
Abandoned
Original Name
Nashville & Memphis Railroad
Additional Name(s)
Memphis & Louisville Railroad
Location
Railroad History

On February 4, 1852, the state of Tennessee chartered the Nashville & Memphis Railroad to build a line between Memphis and Paris, Tennessee, roughly 60 miles west of Clarksville and 130 miles east of Memphis. On Dec. 16, 1853, the Tennessee Legislature passed an act allowing the railroad to change its name to the Memphis & Louisville Railroad.  On Jan. 24, 1854, the railroad's board of directors decided to change its name once again, this time to the Memphis & Ohio. The line would ultimately connect with the Memphis, Clarksville & Louisville at Paris. The Louisville & Nashville seized an opportunity to buy the line on July 1, 1867, after the Memphis & Ohio Railroad defaulted on its interest payments.

Incorporation Date
February 4, 1852
Cessation Date
July 1, 1867
Disposition
Purchased by the Louisville & Nashville
Location
Railroad History

The state of Tennessee chartered the Memphis, Clarksville & Louisville Railroad to build a line between Paris, Tennessee, and the Tennessee-Kentucky state line. The railroad would connect with the Memphis & Ohio in Paris, Tennessee, and the Louisville & Nashville's Memphis Branch at Guthrie, Kentucky, to create a Louisville-to-Memphis line. The railroad began operations in 1859 and completed its line in November 1861. The Louisville & Nashville supported the Memphis, Clarksville & Louisville from its inception, and the Louisville & Nashville purchased the Memphis, Clarksville & Louisville in 1871.

Incorporation Date
January 28, 1852
Cessation Date
1871
Disposition
Sold to the Louisville & Nashville
Location
Railroad History

The Monroe Railroad and Banking Company chartered in December 1833. However, it was not until 1838 that it opened for business with a five-foot gauge line from Macon, Georgia, to Forsyth, Georgia. It extended to Griffin in 1842. However, an economic depression halted construction, but when the railroad started building again, it managed only another 11.25 miles toward Atlanta before falling into bankruptcy. After it was purchased in foreclosure, the railroad changed its in 1845 to the Macon & Western Railroad. This new railroad built 21 more miles of track to complete the line to Atlanta. The Central Railroad and Banking Company of Georgia bought the line in 1872.

Incorporation Date
1833
Cessation Date
1872
Disposition
Sold to the Central of Georgia Railway
Location
Railroad History

The Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad was chartered on Dec. 11, 1845, to build a five-foot gauge line between its two namesake cities and was Tennessee’s first railroad. Its first train, pulled by a locomotive named Tennessee, operated in April 1851 between Nashville and Antioch. After the Civil War, the railroad acquired other companies, and in 1873, the company amended its name to the larger sounding Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway. Despite its new name, the railroad did not St. Louis, and in 1880, the rival Louisville & Nashville Railroad obtained a controlling interest in the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway. However, the two lines remained independent until they merged in 1957.

Incorporation Date
1845
Cessation Date
Name change in 1873
Disposition
Part of CSX Transportation
Railroad History

The New Jersey & New York Railroad traces its origins to the Hackensack and New York Railroad, which was chartered in 1856 and eventually operated between Rutherford, New Jersey, and Hackensack, New Jersey. In 1866, the company rechartered as the Hackensack and New York Extension Railroad and later reorganized as the New Jersey and New York Railroad. It extended its line north of Hackensack, reaching the village of Haverstraw by 1887. The Erie Railroad leased the railroad for 99 years starting in 1896, and it remained an Erie subsidiary until 1960 when the Erie merged to create the Erie Lackawanna Railroad, which subsequently merged in 1976 to form Conrail. Today, the line between Hackensack and Spring Valley, New York, is part of N.J. Transit’s Pascack Valley Line.

Incorporation Date
1866
Cessation Date
1896
Disposition
Leased to Erie Railroad; today part of N.J. Transit’s Pascack Valley Line
Original Name
New Jersey Rail Road and Transportation Company
Location
Railroad History

The state of New Jersey chartered the New Jersey Rail Road and Transportation Company on March 7, 1832, to build a line paralleling the Camden & Amboy. The new line would terminate at Jersey City across from New York City. The Camden & Amboy, worried about competition, exerted its influence in the state legislature, and the New Jersey Rail Road only built between New Brunswick and Jersey City. In early 1867, the Camden & Amboy and the New Jersey Rail Road and Transportation Company combined to make up the United New Jersey Railroad and Canal Company, which the Pennsylvania Railroad leased in 1871 for 999 years.

Incorporation Date
March 7, 1832
Cessation Date
1867
Disposition
Much of its line is part of the modern Northeast Corridor
Railroad History

The Paducah, Tennessee & Alabama was created following a July 1889 consolidation of several earlier companies. However, by the end of October 1893, a federal judge appointed a receiver for the road following a lawsuit filed by creditors in St. Louis. The move made it a prime candidate for a takeover. In October 1895, J.W. Phillips of St. Louis purchased the company for $1 million. He also secured the Tennessee Midland with the intent of merging the lines into a single company. It was soon revealed the Louisville & Nashville was behind the acquisition. The owner resold the companies to the Louisville & Nashville on December 14, 1895.

Incorporation Date
1889
Cessation Date
1895
Disposition
Merged into Louisville & Nashville; later abandoned
Railroad History

The Pennsylvania General Assembly chartered the Philadelphia & Trenton Railroad on February 23, 1832, to build a line between Kensington, Pennsylvania, and the Trenton Bridge at Morrisville, Pennsylvania. On April 16, 1834, the Philadelphia & Trenton Railroad opened an eight-mile stretch between Morrisville and Bristol, using horses to pull trains. In 1836, the Camden & Amboy gained a controlling interest in the line. On June 30, 1871, the Pennsylvania Railroad leased the Philadelphia & Trenton and started operating the line on December 1, 1871. A portion of the line folded into what is today the Northeast Corridor.

Incorporation Date
February 23, 1832
Cessation Date
June 30, 1871
Disposition
Part of the Northeast Corridor
Railroad History

The Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore Railroad was created through the merger of four earlier railroads: the Philadelphia and Delaware County Rail-Road Company; the Baltimore and Port Deposit Rail Road Company; the Delaware and Maryland Rail Road Company; and the Wilmington and Susquehanna Rail Road Company. The new line formed a single road between Philadelphia and Baltimore. The Pennsylvania Railroad took control of the company in 1881 following a fight with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. In 1902, the Pennsylvania Railroad merged the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore and the Baltimore & Potomac railroads to create the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington Railroad.

Incorporation Date
1836
Cessation Date
1902
Disposition
Purchased by the Pennsylvania Railroad; today part of the Northeast Corridor
Railroad Name
Original Name
Memphis Branch Railroad and Steamboat Company of Georgia
Nickname
Riverside Route
Location
Railroad History

The Rome Railroad incorporated in December 1839 as the Memphis Branch Railroad and Steamboat Company of Georgia. The 18-mile-long line opened in December 1849 between Rome and Kingston, Georgia, where it interchanged with the Western & Atlantic Railroad. The Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway purchased the railroad circa 1894 and effectively operated it as an extension Western & Atlantic, which it leased from the state of Georgia starting in 1890. A Rome Railroad locomotive, the William R. Smith, played an important role in the Great Locomotive Chase of 1862 during the Civil War. The Interstate Commerce Commission granted approval for the railroad to abandon the line in 1943.

Incorporation Date
December 21, 1839
Cessation Date
October 23, 1943
Disposition
Abandoned
Headquarters
Rome, Georgia
Railroad Name
Location
Railroad History

The Roswell Railroad was chartered on April 10, 1863, but it wasn’t until Sept. 1, 1881, that the railroad began operations. The line operated from Roswell Junction, where it connected with the Atlanta and Charlotte Air Line Railway (in modern-day Chamblee), and the Chattahoochee River (near Roberts Drive in present-day Sandy Springs). In 1902, the 2.7-mile-long Bull Sluice Railroad branched off near Dunwoody to help the Georgia Railway and Power Company build its hydroelectric Morgan Falls Dam. The railroad initially built the line to a narrow, three-foot gauge; it was broadened to standard gauge circa 1903. The railroad likely operated a combination passenger coach and baggage car, two boxcars and four flat cars. Ike Roberts served as the railroad’s only engineer. The federal government operated the railroad between Jan. 1, 1918, and March 1, 1920, and afterward, the railroad determined it was no longer a viable line; it ceased operations in 1921.

Incorporation Date
1863
Cessation Date
1921
Disposition
Removed
Nickname
“The TF” and “TF & Huckleberry”
Railroad History

The Tallulah Falls Railway traces was organized in March 1898 to buy the Blue Ridge & Atlantic Railroad and extend it to Franklin, North Carolina. The Blue Ridge & Atlantic laid tracks from Cornelia, Georgia, to Tallulah Falls, Georgia. The Tallulah Falls successfully extended tracks to the North Carolina State line in early 1904 and Franklin in June 1907. However, a receiver was appointed for the 57.2-mile-long line in January 1908. Southern Railway took control of the reorganized line. The railroad was not successful throughout its history and was known as “The TF” and “TF & Huckleberry.” The railroad switched from steam power to diesel in 1948, and it ran its final run on March 25, 1961.

Incorporation Date
March 1898
Cessation Date
March 1961
Headquarters
Tallulah Falls, Georgia
Railroad Name
Location
Railroad History

The Walton Railroad was incorporated on Aug. 17, 1872, and amended later to build a 10-mile line between Monroe and Social Circle, Georgia. By 1874, work on the railroad was underway. The railroad’s operations commenced on Sept. 1, 1880. In 1884, the Walton Railroad consolidated with the Gainesville, Jefferson & Southern Railroad. At that time, workers changed the line from standard gauge to narrow gauge to match the Gainesville, Jefferson & Southern Railroad.

Incorporation Date
1872
Cessation Date
1884
Disposition
Consolidated with the Gainesville, Jefferson & Southern Railroad
Location
Railroad History

The state of Georgia chartered the Western & Atlantic Railroad on December 21, 1836, and the state-owned line eventually built a railroad between Atlanta and Chattanooga, Tennessee. The railroad, which formally opened on May 9, 1850, was instrumental for the founding and location of Atlanta, helping it grow from railroad crossroads to a logistics hub. The Western & Atlantic was an integral road during the Civil War. On April 12, 1862, Union spies stole a locomotive with the intent of destroying the line. The state leased the line to a private company for the first time in 1870. CSX Transportation currently leases the line from the state of Georgia.

Incorporation Date
December 1, 1836
Disposition
Leased to CSX Transportation
Headquarters
Atlanta, Georgia

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Before you copy and paste this information to your website, please keep in mind this research took a lot of effort. Appreciate it. Learn from it. But do not plagiarize it. Yes, if you think we might be talking to you, we are.